9th Grade End of the Year Goals

Printable version is available now. This list is of the end of the year goals for your 9th graders.

Reading

– Daily reading

– Log and track progress

Language Arts

– Speak with clarity and purpose to compare two characters or themes.

– Use standard language and grammar.

– Writing

– Use the six traits of writing (content, organization, conventions, voice, sentence

– fluency, word choice).

– Create a thesis statement to guide and frame writing.

– Use conventions of standard written English.

– Develop and support ideas with specific details and examples.

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading Comprehension

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze the text through identifying and applying

– knowledge of characterization, point of view, setting, and conflict.

– A Need for Change – Speeches for Reform

– Students will demonstrate persuasive speaking skills dealing with a current topic of reform.

– Research

– Locate, consult, and cite information from reliable sources about a relevant, current,

– and debatable topic, e.g. school policies, skateboarding bans, etc.

– Prepare a Works Cited page using MLA format.

– Speaking

– Speak with clarity and purpose to persuade the class on a currently debated.

– Speak with appropriate expression, smoothness, pace, volume, eye contact, posture,

– and gestures.

– Use standard language and grammar.

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading

– Read non-fiction resources to inform research.

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze an audience and create arguments geared towards

– changing thought processes.

– To Kill a Mockingbird

– Students will demonstrate speaking, reading, and research skills while studying To Kill a Mockingbird.

– Research

– Locate, consult, and cite information from reliable sources about a relevant reform

– topic, e.g. Civil Rights Movement. Prepare a Works Cited page using MLA format. • Speaking

– Speak with clarity and purpose to inform the class about the research mini-topic. Speak with appropriate expression, smoothness, pace, volume, eye contact,

– posture, and gestures.

– Use standard language and grammar.

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading

– Animal Farm

– Students will demonstrate speaking, listening, writing, reading, and research skills while studying Animal Farm.

– Research

– Locate, consult, and cite information from reliable sources about a relevant type

– of government.

– Prepare a Works Cited page using MLA format.

– Speaking

– Speak with clarity and purpose to inform the class about the Utopian Society. Speak with appropriate expression, smoothness, pace, volume, eye contact,

– posture, and gestures.

– Use standard language and grammar.

– Writing

– Read non-fiction resources to inform research.

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze a novel through identifying and applying

– knowledge of characterization, point of view, conflict and setting. Evaluate Harper Lee’s purpose for writing To Kill a Mockingbird.

– Use the six traits of writing (content, organization, conventions, voice, sentence fluency, word choice)

– Create a thesis statement to guide and frame writing.

– Use conventions of standard written English.

– Develop ideas and content with specific details and examples.

– Explore ideas and personal reactions to the novel through informal and

– persuasive writing.

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading Comprehension

– Read non-fiction resources to inform research.

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze the text through identifying and applying

– knowledge of characterization, point of view, setting, and conflict. Identify and explain the use of allegory and satire in the novel. Evaluate George Orwell’s purpose for writing Animal Farm.

– Poetry

– Students will demonstrate listening, writing, and reading, through a variety of poetry.

– Speaking

– Recite poetry using effective inflections.

– Read poetry following punctuation correctly. • Writing

– Create own poetry.

– Use figurative language in writing a poem or song. • Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes. • Reading Comprehension

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze the text through identifying and applying

– knowledge of figurative language, form, and perspective. • Suggested authors students will be exposed to:

– Langston Hughes

– E.E. Cummings

– Robert Frost

– Carl Sandburg

– Edgar Allan Poe

– Maya Angelou

– Mythology

– Students will demonstrate speaking, listening, reading, and research skills while studying Mythology.

– Research

– Locate, consult, and cite information from reliable sources about a mythological

– figure.

– Prepare a Works Cited page using MLA format.

– Romeo and Juliet

– Students will demonstrate speaking, listening, writing, reading, and research skills while studying Romeo and Juliet.

– Writing

– Use the six traits of writing (content, organization, conventions, voice, sentence

– fluency, word choice)

– Create a thesis statement to guide and frame writing.

– Use conventions of standard written English

– Develop ideas and content with specific details and examples

– Explore ideas and personal reactions to the play through formal writing

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading

– Use background knowledge from class to enhance the understanding of Romeo and Juliet’s historical and cultural contexts.

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze drama through identifying and applying

– knowledge of characterization, plot, point of view, and setting.  Identify and explain the use of irony in the play.

Math

– Geometry

Social Studies

– World History

– Geography

Science

– Biology 1

– Health and nutrition

Visual/Performance

– Dance, Music, Arts

– Drawing and Coloring

– Connect the dots

– Hands on Crafts

PE

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