9th Grade End of the Year Goals

9th Grade End of the Year Goals

Printable version is available now. This list is of the end of the year goals for your 9th graders.

Reading

– Daily reading

– Log and track progress

Language Arts

– Speak with clarity and purpose to compare two characters or themes.

– Use standard language and grammar.

– Writing

– Use the six traits of writing (content, organization, conventions, voice, sentence

– fluency, word choice).

– Create a thesis statement to guide and frame writing.

– Use conventions of standard written English.

– Develop and support ideas with specific details and examples.

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading Comprehension

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze the text through identifying and applying

– knowledge of characterization, point of view, setting, and conflict.

– A Need for Change – Speeches for Reform

– Students will demonstrate persuasive speaking skills dealing with a current topic of reform.

– Research

– Locate, consult, and cite information from reliable sources about a relevant, current,

– and debatable topic, e.g. school policies, skateboarding bans, etc.

– Prepare a Works Cited page using MLA format.

– Speaking

– Speak with clarity and purpose to persuade the class on a currently debated.

– Speak with appropriate expression, smoothness, pace, volume, eye contact, posture,

– and gestures.

– Use standard language and grammar.

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading

– Read non-fiction resources to inform research.

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze an audience and create arguments geared towards

– changing thought processes.

– To Kill a Mockingbird

– Students will demonstrate speaking, reading, and research skills while studying To Kill a Mockingbird.

– Research

– Locate, consult, and cite information from reliable sources about a relevant reform

– topic, e.g. Civil Rights Movement. Prepare a Works Cited page using MLA format. • Speaking

– Speak with clarity and purpose to inform the class about the research mini-topic. Speak with appropriate expression, smoothness, pace, volume, eye contact,

– posture, and gestures.

– Use standard language and grammar.

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading

– Animal Farm

– Students will demonstrate speaking, listening, writing, reading, and research skills while studying Animal Farm.

– Research

– Locate, consult, and cite information from reliable sources about a relevant type

– of government.

– Prepare a Works Cited page using MLA format.

– Speaking

– Speak with clarity and purpose to inform the class about the Utopian Society. Speak with appropriate expression, smoothness, pace, volume, eye contact,

– posture, and gestures.

– Use standard language and grammar.

– Writing

– Read non-fiction resources to inform research.

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze a novel through identifying and applying

– knowledge of characterization, point of view, conflict and setting. Evaluate Harper Lee’s purpose for writing To Kill a Mockingbird.

– Use the six traits of writing (content, organization, conventions, voice, sentence fluency, word choice)

– Create a thesis statement to guide and frame writing.

– Use conventions of standard written English.

– Develop ideas and content with specific details and examples.

– Explore ideas and personal reactions to the novel through informal and

– persuasive writing.

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading Comprehension

– Read non-fiction resources to inform research.

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze the text through identifying and applying

– knowledge of characterization, point of view, setting, and conflict. Identify and explain the use of allegory and satire in the novel. Evaluate George Orwell’s purpose for writing Animal Farm.

– Poetry

– Students will demonstrate listening, writing, and reading, through a variety of poetry.

– Speaking

– Recite poetry using effective inflections.

– Read poetry following punctuation correctly. • Writing

– Create own poetry.

– Use figurative language in writing a poem or song. • Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes. • Reading Comprehension

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze the text through identifying and applying

– knowledge of figurative language, form, and perspective. • Suggested authors students will be exposed to:

– Langston Hughes

– E.E. Cummings

– Robert Frost

– Carl Sandburg

– Edgar Allan Poe

– Maya Angelou

– Mythology

– Students will demonstrate speaking, listening, reading, and research skills while studying Mythology.

– Research

– Locate, consult, and cite information from reliable sources about a mythological

– figure.

– Prepare a Works Cited page using MLA format.

– Romeo and Juliet

– Students will demonstrate speaking, listening, writing, reading, and research skills while studying Romeo and Juliet.

– Writing

– Use the six traits of writing (content, organization, conventions, voice, sentence

– fluency, word choice)

– Create a thesis statement to guide and frame writing.

– Use conventions of standard written English

– Develop ideas and content with specific details and examples

– Explore ideas and personal reactions to the play through formal writing

– Listening

– Use listening skills in practical settings.

– Adapt listening skills for specific purposes.

– Reading

– Use background knowledge from class to enhance the understanding of Romeo and Juliet’s historical and cultural contexts.

– Read for literal, interpretive, and evaluative comprehension.

– Demonstrate the ability to analyze drama through identifying and applying

– knowledge of characterization, plot, point of view, and setting.  Identify and explain the use of irony in the play.

Math

– Geometry

Social Studies

– World History

– Geography

Science

– Biology 1

– Health and nutrition

Visual/Performance

– Dance, Music, Arts

– Drawing and Coloring

– Connect the dots

– Hands on Crafts

PE

I'm the mom to Matthew, which we run and own Matthew's Kitchen. I'm 27 and studying to be a pastry chef. I love to cook and bake but my passion is in the pastry arts. Matthew is a 5 year old who began cooking when he was 1. Through the years he has not only gained valuable skills but has grown his palette. Together we want to share our passion for food with you and your family
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