Dr. Who Minecraft Lesson

Are you a whovian like we are? Dr. Who is a great jumping point for many historical points. While it is science fiction, there are so many episodes that touch on history, Check out this awesome mod we found.

There are several Tardis mods but this one is the nest for serval reasons.

1. Looks just like in the show

2. Bigger on the inside

3. Workable buttons

4. Takes you to several locations like in the show.

The Tardis takes you to an Ancient Temple, Woodland Mansion, and an Ocean Monument Base.

The Tardis also features a portal room, lavatory, and new corridors.

Now granted Dr. Who has been on for 42 years. That is a lot of seasons but there is a lot of history (and sci Fi) involved. Those episodes are:

Season 14, Episode 6: The Talons of Weng-Chiang – Jack the Ripper

London, 1888. A maniac is stalking the streets of Whitechapel, targeting prostitutes, killing them, and sending gruesome trophies and taunting letters to the police and press. The crimes were never solved and the murderer was never identified (though there have been plenty of suspects), but he became known as Jack the Ripper. The general public quickly became frustrated with the inability of the police to find a murderer, and newspapers took to hiring private detectives, a la Sherlock Holmes, whose first adventure had been printed just the year before.

Season 3, Episode 4: The Daleks – Cuban Missile Crisis

The Cuban Missile Crisis was still very much on people’s minds in 1963, when Doctor Who first launched. The crisis had reached a fever pitch when the Soviet Union announced that it would respond to the placing of intermediate range ballistic missiles in Italy and Turkey by placing its own missiles within reach of the United States, on the Soviet-aligned island of Cuba. This would give both nations, for the first time, the ability to rain death upon one another at will. The two nations eventually agreed to pull their missiles back.K.

Season 12, Episode 1: Robot – The Development of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles

The missile threat only got worse. By the late 1960s, intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) were a reality, allowing missiles stored anywhere to strike anywhere else on the planet. By the 1970s, storable propellants brought a new element: Missiles could be kept armed, fueled, programmed, and ready to fire at a moment’s notice, in sufficient numbers to ensure that if anyone attacked you, you could make sure it was the last thing they ever did. This was an awesome power, and one with an obvious potential for abuse: You need only fear people who have no interest in the survival of their own nation. And as more nations acquired both nuclear weapons and the technology needed to deliver them, this worry became ever more clear.

Season 4, Episode 7: The Unicorn and the Wasp – The Disappearance of Agatha Christie

In 1926, Agatha Christie’s husband Archie revealed that he was having an affair and asked for a divorce. On December 8, 1926, they had a fight of some kind and her husband left. So did Agatha, leaving only a note stating that she was going to Yorkshire. No further trace of her was found until she turned up at a hotel eleven days later in Harrogate, Yorkshire. She would give no explanation of her disappearance;though many believe it was a stunt staged to embarrass or otherwise inconvenience her husband, a more recent theory posits that she was considering suicide.

Season 2, Episode 8: The Chase – The Abandonment of Mary Celeste

On December 4, 1872, the crew of the Dei Gratia sighted another vessel sailing in the Atlantic Ocean. Something didn’t look right about her, as if she was not being properly helmed, and the Dei Gratia moved in closer and identified it as the Mary Celeste. They could see no one on board, and after a while, although she flew no distress signal, they decided to board her. They found the ship deserted. The cargo and personal effects of the crew were all intact, along with ample provisions for the voyage, but most of the ship’s papers were missing, along with a lifeboat. The ship appeared to have been abandoned in a hurry, but since the crew and passengers were never seen again, to this day no one knows exactly what happened.

Season 5, Episode 10: Vincent and the Doctor – Vincent Van Gogh’s Final years

Born in the Netherlands on March 30, 1853, Vincent van Gogh lived a life which is, for many, the epitome of the tormented artist. Though wildly famous today, in his lifetime he toiled in obscurity, unable to sell his paintings and frustrated at his inability to work during bouts of mental illness. His most productive period was the last two years of life. He moved to the city of Arles in 1888 with visions of starting an artists’ colony; this dream went unrealized and he began to feel increasingly abandoned. The townsfolk called him mad and wanted him removed; fellow artist Paul Gaugin visited, but ultimately rejected the idea of continued artistic collaboration; and his bouts of madness grew progressively worse, longer, and more frequent. In 1890, he is believed to have shot himself, although some believe it was an accident and not a suicide.

Season 13, Episode 1: Terror of the Zygons – Oil Rugs: Terror at Sea

Lasting just three years, from 1189 to 1192, the Third Crusade attempted to retake the Holy Land from Saladin, who had conquered them in 1187 as part of an effort to reduce Christian influence in the region. In western Europe, King Henry II of England and King Philip II of France made a pact to end their long war and join together against Saladin, and obtained the full support of the Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick Barbarossa (and then his successor, Leopold V). Henry II died before he could go far, but Richard I “the Lionheart” enthusiastically took up the task. A combined English, French, and German/Austrian force drove the Saracens out of Acre, and both Philip II and the Emperor returned to Europe.

Richard I wasn’t done, though. He took additional cities, remaining undefeated during his stay in the Holy Land. The Crusade was not fully successful, and Richard I signed a treaty with Saladin in 1192, leaving Jerusalem under Muslim control but allowing pilgrims and merchants access to the city while a Christian presence remained in Cyprus and Syria. Richard returned home in October of 1192

Season 2, Episode 6: The Crusade- Third Crusade

The Cold War wasn’t the only big news during the early years of Doctor Who. The first British North Sea oil well was drilled in 1965. That was also the year of the first accident. The first oil rig on the British continental shelf collapsed under rough seas and sank, killing 13 men. (The remaining 14 crew survived.) By 1970, the fields were ready to be commercially exploited, eliminating Britain’s dependence on foreign oil by 1979. But the accident in 1965 wouldn’t be the last. In 1968, the Odeco Ocean Prince broke up and sank; all crew were evacuated safely. The Constellation sank under tow in 1969. In 1974, the Transocean 3 collapsed and then capsized; all crew were evacuated safely. Still, drilling remained popular, and had a dramatic effect on the economic situation in Scotland. Its northerly location made it a prime source of labor of the rigs, creating an employment boom.

Season 2, Episode 4: The Romans- Emperor Nero

Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus was born December 15, 37 AD. Though related to the Emperor, he was not considered a major contender for the throne until Claudius adopted him and made him his heir. At this time, he changed his name to Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, and in 54 AD, he became the Emperor Nero. He quickly worked to consolidate his power, using poison and other means to eliminate rivals, ultimately including his own mother. He was a very busy emperor, but of mixed popularity; on one hand, he was responsible for considerable tax reform, but he scandalized conservative Romans by bringing in Greek-inspired theater and even performing the lyre himself, which the more tradition-minded felt was an invitation to immorality.

But the event for which he is best known occurred on July 18, 64: the Great Fire of Rome. Though the cause of the fire is unknown, many ancient historians blamed Nero, saying that he had the city burned to clear the way for massive public works projects. This may not be true, since Nero contributed enormous personal time and money and even the use of his palaces to care for the survivors. As rumor started to paint Nero as the villain, he used the ever-popular strategy of blaming an unpopular minority: He blamed it on Christians, having them tortured and burned publicly to appease the public. His reign continued another four years, and then, facing a revolt, he committed suicide. His death ended the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

Season 1, Episode 6: The Aztecs – Aztec Empire

The Aztecs were a group of Mesoamericans who dominated much of what is now Mexico when the Spanish Conquistadors arrived in the 16th century. Although the Conquistadors emphasized the brutality of their customs (particularly human sacrifice) in order to justify their conquest, they weren’t mere butchers and had a complex society, advanced architecture, and a rich mythological structure. But the human sacrifice thing was very real. Unlike most ancient cultures, they didn’t perform sacrifice to appease their gods; they felt the gods could not be controlled, but that sacrifice at the appropriate times would nourish the right gods at the right times to achieve particular effects, such as bringing the rain. The empire reached its zenith in 1519—shortly before Cortes arrived and ended it all.

Season 4, Episode 4: The Highlanders – Battle of Culloden

In 1745, the Jacobites rebelled, seeking to overthrow the House of Hanover and restore the House of Stuart to the British throne. This uprising sought to place James III back on the thrones of England and Scotland, and was led primarily by Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) with heavy support from Highland clans in Scotland, and also the backing of the French king, who probably preferred a Catholic on the English throne and the ending of hostilities between England and France. The process began well, but soon faltered, and in under a year was a disaster. The Jacobites staged their final land battle at Culloden Moor, a valiantly fought effort on bad ground where thousands died. The government troops pursued the Jacobites vigorously, hunting them down and committing many acts which today would be considered war crimes in their ardor. Charles managed to flee, wandering the Highlands for a while before escaping to France, and the English government began a brutal crackdown to retaliate, attempting to wipe Gaelic culture and the clan system off the map and prevent a recurrence. He spent most of the rest of his life in France and Rome (apart from a brief visit to London), in exile.

Season 7, Episode 4: Inferno – Energy Crisis

The reason North Sea oil was so important, of course, was the energy crisis. German oil production peaked in 1966; Venezuela and the United States peaked in 1970. Great Britain was already massively dependent on foreign oil, the promises of North Sea oil not yet realized. Although the worst was yet to come, by 1970, headlines talked of a looming energy crisis and the need to find alternate sources.

Season 13, Episode 3: Pyramids of Mars – Discovery of Martian Pyramids

In 1971, the Mariner 9 spacecraft became the first manmade object to orbit another planet. Although previous flyby missions had revealed that Mars was pocked with craters and appeared lifeless, this would be the first chance to make a proper survey of the world. The first few months of the mission were disappointing; a global sandstorm was blanketing the planet. But then the sand settled out. Among many amazing discoveries, such as the first discovery of volcanoes on another world, there was a group of mesas with a striking appearance on these early low-res images: They looked like pyramids, and pyramids would mean intelligent life capable of massive public works projects.

Skeptics were cautious, and indeed, later missions have revealed them to be natural formations. But when the “pyramid” photos came back on February 8, 1972, they made headlines all the same.

Anyway, have fun watching, exploring and learning more than you realize.

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